Juliet the Mini Doll Premium Crochet Pattern

Juliet the Mini Doll is a petite sized doll with an elegant golden dress that fits in the palm of your hand. The eponymous character from one of the “houses alike in dignity,” Juliet appears here garbed in an innocent yellow dress characteristic of her costume from the ball scene Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet, choreographed by Kenneth Macmillan.

Juliet the Mini Doll—an easy amigurumi doll—is my newest crochet pattern!

Read on to learn more about my design process and inspiration. To make this doll, grab the beautifully formatted, ad-free, PDF pattern from Etsy here.

A Storybook Princess

I’ve been loving making so many amigurumi dolls like the Sugar Plum Fairy and Carmen, and Juliet is the next one in line! She has a chibi stature just like Carmen, and features a gorgeous yellow dress with gold accents and embroidery details.

Doll hair can be extremely complex and frustrating to create, but I love that Juliet’s hairstyle is simple and no more difficult than any other part of the doll. She has an elegant hair cap and bun that come together to form her ballerina hairstyle, with two small braid accents. Juliet is perfect for a confident beginner who has made a teddy bear or two and maybe even a doll, but she can be simplified or embellished as you wish! Of course, the best part of amigurumi dolls is that they can be customized to match anyone or any outfit you choose.

Another Musical Design!

Juliet’s outfit was inspired by the ballet of Romeo and Juliet scored by Prokofiev (and the Macmillan choreography). She has a bun because she’s a ballerina, and the two little braids on either side of her head interestingly appear to be a common theme across productions.

Romeo and Juliet (the play) was first produced by Shakespeare in 1597, but has origins in a story called Pyramus and Thisbe, related in Ovid’s Metamorphoses in 8 AD. This story in turn had roots prior to that time in an etiological myth to explain the color of mulberries. All that is to say, this is a tale nearly as old as time.

More recently, the classical composer Sergei Prokofiev wrote a score for a ballet production of Romeo and Juliet, premiering in 1940 in Soviet Russia, to which English choreographer Kenneth Macmillan later choreographed his own performance in 1964 for the Royal Ballet, resulting in a gripping, ethereal rendition of an ancient story. In this version, Juliet is commonly costumed as a young woman with her hair coiled in a bun and braids as well as a white or yellow dress with gold accents.

Here’s another version from the same choreography, where the ballerina dancing Juliet wears a slightly different dress (still white and gold), and appears to have a similar hairstyle. The version that I crocheted does not have quite as many embellishments, but the bands across the body attempt to echo the kind of finery that Juliet is wearing in this scene.

To see Juliet’s costume in action, watch the famous balcony scene (“but soft, what light through yonder window breaks?”), where Juliet and Romeo meet for the first time as themselves, rendered heartbreakingly beautiful through ballet.

Juliet often wears white or yellow either to signal her status as a young, unwed girl, or also to indicate her neutrality in the conflict between the Montagues (symbolized with blue) and Capulets (symbolized with red). To see a truly epic visual of what the Capulets may have looked like, watch the “Dance of the Knights” to see one of the fair houses in Verona strutting their stuff for all they’re worth. The pompous, grandiose melody is one of the most iconic melodies from Prokofiev’s score and simply emanates grandeur.

The low brass punctuate the haughty steps of the lords and the violins sing the curtseys of the ladies. Though characterized by different instruments, both melodies manage to convey an utter disdain that is almost palpable through the screen when coupled with an outrageously swaggering dance.

I had the opportunity to play an orchestral suite of this ballet a year ago with the Berkshire Symphony and I may have died of happiness. Funnily enough, I had to play excerpts from the notoriously difficult Tybalt’s Death scene a few years prior for a youth orchestra that I did not end up getting into, but getting to play the Dance of the Knights in orchestra definitely made up for it. But I digress.

Get The Pattern

  • To make this pattern, grab the beautifully formatted, ad-free, PDF pattern from Etsy here!
  • Pin this pattern to your Pinterest boards here:

Description

Juliet the Mini Doll is a petite sized doll with an elegant golden dress that fits in the palm of your hand. The eponymous character from one of the “houses alike in dignity,” Juliet appears here garbed in an innocent yellow dress characteristic of her costume from the ball scene Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet, choreographed by Kenneth Macmillan.

Yarn

  • Hobbii Amigo (sport)
    • (<1 skein) Light Peach
    • (<1 skein) Curry
    • (<1 skein) Primrose
      • light yellow
    • (<1 skein) Light Pink

Notions

  • Size D (3.25 mm) Clover Amour crochet hook
  • 6.0 mm safety eyes
  • tapestry needle
  • polyester fiberfill
  • stitch markers
  • black embroidery thread
  • (optional) hot glue gun

I hope you like Juliet the Mini Doll! If you run into any problems feel free to ask me a question in the comments section below or through email at littleworldofwhimsy@gmail.com.